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Alistair Whitton
Neville Gabie

Alistair Whitton's contribution to 'Kraal' reflects his experience of South Africa - its history, land and people- in an attempt to come to terms with his own place within it. His work is representative of mapping a terrain that is both physical and spiritual, personal and political.

For Neville Gabie making sculpture is a means of exploring. It is a process that he uses to pick away at the fabric of a place in order to come to an understanding of it. His concern is for both urban and rural landscapes, but particular of both, he chooses to work in places which exist in a state of flux; building sites, streets, waste ground and abandoned buildings. Areas in which evidence of previous habitation might have left traces which reveal something of the political, emotional or cultural shifts taking place.

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Alistair Whitton's recent exhibitions include 'Material Evidence' at the Institute for Contemporary Arts in Johannesburg, 'Dis-Ease' Young South African Contemporaries at the Axiom Centre for the Arts in Cheltenham and 'Lifetimes: Contemporary Art from South Africa' at the Aktionsforum Praterinsel in Munich.

Neville Gabie
has lectured at the Natal Technikon School of Art in Durban in 1996, and has exhibited extensively in the UK and South Africa; including a solo exhibition at the Civic Gallery in Johannesburg. His work is also in the Arts Council permanent collection and was included in 'Recent British Sculpture', an Arts Council exhibition in 1993-4.

Alistair Whitton
Neville Gabie

Alistair Whitton's contribution to 'Kraal' reflects his experience of South Africa - its history, land and people- in an attempt to come to terms with his own place within it. His work is representative of mapping a terrain that is both physical and spiritual, personal and political.

For Neville Gabie making sculpture is a means of exploring. It is a process that he uses to pick away at the fabric of a place in order to come to an understanding of it. His concern is for both urban and rural landscapes, but particular of both, he chooses to work in places which exist in a state of flux; building sites, streets, waste ground and abandoned buildings. Areas in which evidence of previous habitation might have left traces which reveal something of the political, emotional or cultural shifts taking place.

***

Alistair Whitton's recent exhibitions include 'Material Evidence' at the Institute for Contemporary Arts in Johannesburg, 'Dis-Ease' Young South African Contemporaries at the Axiom Centre for the Arts in Cheltenham and 'Lifetimes: Contemporary Art from South Africa' at the Aktionsforum Praterinsel in Munich.

Neville Gabie
has lectured at the Natal Technikon School of Art in Durban in 1996, and has exhibited extensively in the UK and South Africa; including a solo exhibition at the Civic Gallery in Johannesburg. His work is also in the Arts Council permanent collection and was included in 'Recent British Sculpture', an Arts Council exhibition in 1993-4.